Quick decisions tend to reinforce self-interest choices among MBA students: The direct and moderating effects of temporal constraint and situational factors in ethical decision making

Abstract : Employees face increasingly time‐pressured operational environments. Using theory from Reynolds' (2006) neurocognitive model of ethical decision making, we explore how temporal constraint, consequence framing, and organizational norms affect self‐interested decision making in business. Conducting three experimental manipulations with a sample of MBA students, we found the following: First, consistent with previous studies, high time pressure promotes self‐interested intentions. Second, unethical framing encourages self‐interested intentions, though this relationship is unaffected by the presence of time pressure. Third, unethical organizational norms encourage group‐interested intentions. Lastly, however, when these same norms are experienced under high time pressure, individuals display self‐interested intentions. Copyright © 2016 ASAC. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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https://hal.umontpellier.fr/hal-02010936
Contributeur : Odile Hennaut <>
Soumis le : jeudi 7 février 2019 - 15:35:55
Dernière modification le : jeudi 6 juin 2019 - 14:42:09

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  • HAL Id : hal-02010936, version 1

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Meena Andiappan, Lucas Dufour. Quick decisions tend to reinforce self-interest choices among MBA students: The direct and moderating effects of temporal constraint and situational factors in ethical decision making. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences - Revue Canadienne des Sciences de l'Administration, Wiley, 2018, 35 (1), pp.20-33. ⟨hal-02010936⟩

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