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Article Dans Une Revue Nature reviews Disease primers Année : 2021

Restless legs syndrome

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Résumé

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an urge to move that appears during rest or is exacerbated by rest, that occurs in the evening or night and that disappears during movement or is improved by movement. Symptoms vary considerably in age at onset, frequency and severity, with severe forms affecting sleep, quality of life and mood. Patients with RLS often display periodic leg movements during sleep or resting wakefulness. RLS is considered to be a complex condition in which predisposing genetic factors, environmental factors and comorbidities contribute to the expression of the disorder. RLS occurs alone or with comorbidities, for example, iron deficiency and kidney disease, but also with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and neurological, rheumatological and respiratory disorders. The pathophysiology is still unclear, with the involvement of brain iron deficiency, dysfunction in the dopaminergic and nociceptive systems and altered adenosine and glutamatergic pathways as hypotheses being investigated. RLS is poorly recognized by physicians and it is accordingly often incorrectly diagnosed and managed. Treatment guidelines recommend initiation of therapy with low doses of dopamine agonists or α2δ ligands in severe forms. Although dopaminergic treatment is initially highly effective, its long-term use can result in a serious worsening of symptoms known as augmentation. Other treatments include opioids and iron preparations.
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Dates et versions

hal-03646934 , version 1 (20-04-2022)

Identifiants

Citer

Mauro Manconi, Diego Garcia-Borreguero, Barbara Schormair, Aleksandar Videnovic, Klaus Berger, et al.. Restless legs syndrome. Nature reviews Disease primers, 2021, 7 (1), pp.80. ⟨10.1038/s41572-021-00311-z⟩. ⟨hal-03646934⟩
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