Residential movements of top predators in Chile's most isolated marine protected area: Implications for the conservation of the Galapagos shark, Carcharhinus galapagensis, and the yellowtail amberjack, Seriola lalandi - Université de Montpellier Accéder directement au contenu
Article Dans Une Revue Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems Année : 2020

Residential movements of top predators in Chile's most isolated marine protected area: Implications for the conservation of the Galapagos shark, Carcharhinus galapagensis, and the yellowtail amberjack, Seriola lalandi

Naiti A. Morales
  • Fonction : Auteur
Maike Heidemeyer
  • Fonction : Auteur
Sebastian Hernandez
  • Fonction : Auteur
Enzo Acuna
  • Fonction : Auteur
Carlos F. Gaymer
  • Fonction : Auteur

Résumé

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are becoming a widely used tool for the conservation of biodiversity and for fishery management; however, most of these areas are designed without prior knowledge of the basic ecological aspects of the species that they are trying to protect. This study investigated the movement of two top predators: the Galapagos shark, Carcharhinus galapagensis, and the yellowtail amberjack, Seriola lalandi, in and around the Motu Motiro Hiva Marine Park (MMHMP) using MiniPAT satellite tags to determine the effectiveness of this MPA for the protection of these species. The Galapagos sharks (n = 4) spent most of their tag deployment periods inside the MMHMP. However, high intraspecific variability was observed in their movement dynamics. Daily individual maximum movements ranged from 17 to 58 km and the maximum distance from Salas y Gomez Island, the only emergent island within the MMHMP, ranged from 31 to 139 km. The maximum linear distance travelled for a female juvenile Galapagos shark (152 cm total length) was 236 km, which is greater than the maximum distance previously documented for juveniles of this species (\textless50 km). For the yellowtail amberjack (n = 1), 91% of the satellite geolocations were within the MMHMP, with a maximum daily distance travelled of 6 km. The maximum distance travelled between points was 111 km and the maximum distance from Salas y Gomez Island was 62 km. All archival tagged fish spent most of their time at depths of This study provides a baseline on the movement of these two top predators in the MMHMP and provides valuable insights for the creation of MPAs in the region and elsewhere.
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Dates et versions

hal-03411047 , version 1 (02-11-2021)

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Citer

Naiti A. Morales, Maike Heidemeyer, Robert Bauer, Sebastian Hernandez, Enzo Acuna, et al.. Residential movements of top predators in Chile's most isolated marine protected area: Implications for the conservation of the Galapagos shark, Carcharhinus galapagensis, and the yellowtail amberjack, Seriola lalandi. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 2020, ⟨10.1002/aqc.3472⟩. ⟨hal-03411047⟩
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