Hitchhiking of deleterious alleles and the cost of adaptation in partially selfing species. - Université de Montpellier Accéder directement au contenu
Article Dans Une Revue Genetics Année : 2014

Hitchhiking of deleterious alleles and the cost of adaptation in partially selfing species.

Résumé

Self-fertilization is generally seen to be disadvantageous in the long term. It increases genetic drift, which subsequently reduces polymorphism and the efficiency of selection, which also challenges adaptation. However, high selfing rates can increase the fixation probability of recessive beneficial mutations, but existing theory has generally not accounted for the effect of linked sites. Here, we analyze a model for the fixation probability of deleterious mutants that hitchhike with selective sweeps in diploid, partially selfing populations. Approximate analytical solutions show that, conditional on the sweep not being lost by drift, higher inbreeding rates increase the fixation probability of the deleterious allele, due to the resulting reduction in polymorphism and effective recombination. When extending the analysis to consider a distribution of deleterious alleles, as well as the average fitness increase after a sweep, we find that beneficial alleles generally need to be more recessive than the previously assumed dominance threshold (h < 1/2) for selfing to be beneficial from one-locus theory. Our results highlight that recombination aiding the efficiency of selection on multiple loci amplifies the fitness benefits of outcrossing over selfing, compared to results obtained from one-locus theory. This effect additionally increases the parameter range under which obligate outcrossing is beneficial over partial selfing.

Domaines

Génétique

Dates et versions

hal-03019702 , version 1 (23-11-2020)

Identifiants

Citer

Matthew Hartfield, Sylvain Glémin. Hitchhiking of deleterious alleles and the cost of adaptation in partially selfing species.. Genetics, 2014, 196 (1), pp.281-93. ⟨10.1534/genetics.113.158196⟩. ⟨hal-03019702⟩
31 Consultations
0 Téléchargements

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More