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Article Dans Une Revue Emerging microbes & infections Année : 2017

Diversity and role of cave-dwelling hematophagous insects in pathogen transmission in the Afrotropical region

Résumé

The progressive anthropization of caves for food resources or economic purposes increases human exposure to pathogens that naturally infect cave-dwelling animals. The presence of wild or domestic animals in the immediate surroundings of caves also may contribute to increasing the risk of emergence of such pathogens. Some zoonotic pathogens are transmitted through direct contact, but many others require arthropod vectors, such as blood-feeding insects. In Africa, hematophagous insects often play a key role in the epidemiology of many pathogens; however, their ecology in cave habitats remains poorly known. During the last decades, several investigations carried out in Afrotropical caves suggested the medical and veterinary importance particularly of insect taxa of the Diptera order. Therefore, the role of some of these insects as vectors of pathogens that infect cave-dwelling vertebrates has been studied. The present review summarizes these findings, brings insights into the diversity of cave-dwelling hematophagous Diptera and their involvement in pathogen transmission, and finally discusses new challenges and future research directions.
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Dates et versions

hal-01937739 , version 1 (28-11-2018)

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Judicaël Obame-Nkoghe, Eric M. Leroy, Christophe Paupy. Diversity and role of cave-dwelling hematophagous insects in pathogen transmission in the Afrotropical region. Emerging microbes & infections, 2017, 6 (4), pp.e20. ⟨10.1038/emi.2017.6⟩. ⟨hal-01937739⟩
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